Morality of Clones

Discussion in 'Debate Hall' started by mamboking053, Apr 17, 2019 at 3:03 PM.

  1. mamboking053

    mamboking053 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2018
    While autoing through some battles, I realized that if human drone technology (biological drones) were ever created, this would likely be one of their most used applications and they would probably be sent into war in a similar fashion- if not cutting rocks on Mars or something.

    Given some of the debate surrounding abortion, I think this hits the same buttons. What is considered "living" and is it moral to subject a living being to an opportunist or utilitarian cultural or sub-cultural philosophy? (ie, would it be moral to use clones for warfare or to create clones at all that are commodities and tools rather than living beings?)
     
  2. Super Catanian

    Super Catanian Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2018
    There is a video on YouTube made by Kurzgesagt that somewhat covers that subject.

    Personally, I believe that something is considered "living" when it has 100% the potential to gain consciousness. I mention this to include unborn babies. Although (in my eyes, anyways) they can't think freely, as they are just a cluster of zygotes, they have that potential to gain consciousness, once they are born and learn more about their world. Robots can't do that, since they are merely programmed with knowledge, but cannot think freely by themselves, and probably never will be. That is what separates the living from artificial intelligence.
    If human clones were to be created, they probably would have consciousness, since they are exact carbon copies of a regular human being.
     
  3. RazorbackPirate

    RazorbackPirate Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2018
    How about we don't ever create stuff like that so we don't have to ever confront the answers to the questions you ask. This is a perfect example of, "Just because you can, doesn't mean you should." But ... "As in the days of Noah..."
     
  4. mamboking053

    mamboking053 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2018
    This is my personal opinion...

    But I don't think we think freely, either. I think the only real difference between current robots and humans is that our neurological circuitry has thousands of years of evolution on it's side. Robots are programmed with a limited number of logical pathways. Humans are also, but we have many, many more of them and so our greater range of options may give the illusion of free choice rather than more choices.

    For instance... Imagine if a robot is only programmed to be able to go north, south, east, or west. Tell it to follow a rabbit and no matter how fast the robot could go, it will have a difficult time because the rabbit has more options of movement.

    Reprogram that robot it now be able to travel north-east, north-west, south-east, and south-west along with the original cardinal directions, and it has an easier time. It now has more options and it's movements are less clunky.

    Similarly, the computers of today can "think" far better than their most distant ancestors. The computers today are approaching a resemblance of the fluidity of actual biological autonomy. The more option we program into them, the greater this will become. From my perspective, I ask myself the question "Was mankind, animals, and all their associated relatives and ancestors always autonomous, or was their a point where they, too, were in a state that would be considered non-organic and they became organic and then they became autonomous? If so...how? And if so...couldn't this process be repeated, especially when humans are effectively expediting the process of evolution by trying to intentionally create things that are autonomous?"
     
  5. mamboking053

    mamboking053 Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2018
    Unfortunately, morality has never gotten in the way of innovation before and I doubt it ever will.

    "If it can be done it will be done".
     
    Graviton and HtebazilEAB like this.
  6. HtebazilEAB

    HtebazilEAB Member

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2018
    Yep... Unless they can make more money by not inventing something, that is!
     

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