What's this G stand for?

ITown

Well-Known Member


I recently reached 1 billion coins, so I expected my coin total to say "1000M" or "1B", but I wasn't expecting "1G"

What's it stand for? 1 gazillion?
 

jlshetler

Member
It surprises me that this abbreviation is used on the US server, in which country B is the standard abbreviation for 1,000,000,000. It does make sense to use it on the other servers, including EN. But the US server rightly avoids "honour," "centre," and "civilisation," so it ought to also avoid G for this number.
 

DeletedUser26154

What a staggeringly huge amount of coin. I mean just wow. 187,000 medals would buy me a lot of very welcomed expansions.
 

DeletedUser13838

How many gigs of memory does your computer have? How many gigs of storage does your phone have?
 

DeletedUser13838

I never heard anyone use the term gigavolt. I read somewhere that oak ridge produced a record 25 megavolts but that was a while ago. You might be thinking of electron volts. The LHC is up to 13 TeV. :)
 

DeletedUser3679

I never heard anyone use the term gigavolt. I read somewhere that oak ridge produced a record 25 megavolts but that was a while ago. You might be thinking of electron volts. The LHC is up to 13 TeV. :)
from the CERN website-

"AWAKE will use proton beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) in the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) facility (see image above for proposed location). These protons will be injected into a 10-metre plasma cell to initiate strong wakefields. A second beam – the “witness” electron beam – would then be accelerated by the wakefields, gaining up to several gigavolts of energy. Following AWAKE's approval in autumn 2013, the first proton beams are expected to be sent to the plasma cell at the end of 2016.
 

DeletedUser8152

fA second beam – the “witness” electron beam – would then be accelerated by the wakefields, gaining up to several gigavolts of energy.
Strictly speaking that is a mistake, they really mean giga-electron-volts of energy. But when dealing with electrons its pretty easy to abbreviate it to volts. Really volts measures the electric potential, not the potential energy.
 

DeletedUser3679

Strictly speaking that is a mistake, they really mean giga-electron-volts of energy. But when dealing with electrons its pretty easy to abbreviate it to volts. Really volts measures the electric potential, not the potential energy.
All I was doing was replying to the post that said they never heard of the term 'gigavolt.' My post is an exact quote from CERN's official web site. I will leave it to you to notify them of their mistake.;)
 

DeletedUser8152

Hah, in practice those guys refer to mass and momentum using 'volts' as well. Gotta let the particle physicists do their thing :)